UPMC Physician Resources

Janet S. Lee, MD

Janet S. Lee, MD

Office Address(es):

UPMC Montefiore Hospital - NW628
3459 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Phone: 412-692-2210
Fax: 412-692-2260

Dr. Lee received her doctoral degree at Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1995.  She completed her internship and residency training at University of Alabama at Birmingham, and then went onto pursue a Pulmonary and Critical Care fellowship at University of Washington in Seattle, Washington.  During her post-doctoral fellowship, Dr. Lee pursued basic research in chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions, leukocyte migration and recruitment related to the pathogenesis of lung inflammation and injury.  In 2004, she joined the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.

Publications:

Mangalmurti NS, Xiong Z, Hulver M, Ranganathan M, Liu XH, Oriss T, Rubin M, Triulzi D, Choi A, Lee JS*.  Loss of Red cell Chemokine Scavenging Promotes Transfusion Related Lung Inflammation.  Blood Nov 2008 (In Press).

McComb JG, Ranganathan M, Liu XH, Pilewski JM, Ray P, Watkins SC, Choi AM, Lee JS.  CX3CL1 Upregulation is Associated with Recruitment of CX3CR1+ Mononuclear Phagocytes and T Lymphocytes in the Lungs during Cigarette Smoke Induced Emphysema.  Am J Pathol  2008 Oct;173(4):949-61. Epub 2008 Sep 4.

Lee JS*, Wurfel MM, Matute-Bello G, Frevert CW, Rosengart MR, Ranganathan M, Wong VW, Holden T, Sutlief S, Richmond A, Peiper SC, Martin TR. The Duffy Antigen Modifies Systemic and Local Tissue Chemokine Responses Following LPS Stimulation.  J Immunol 2006 Dec 1;177(11):8086-94.

Research Interests:

Dr. Lee’s research interests include chemokine-mediated lung inflammation, and the role of chemokines in altering the lung microenvironment’s response to injury.  One primary focus of the laboratory is the role of Duffy antigen chemokine binding protein as a model for examining in vivo consequences of erythrocyte membrane protein alterations during red cell storage. We are interested in how red cell transfusion can provide a secondary signal for the development of acute lung inflammation and injury in a murine model of endotoxemia.  Another focus of the laboratory is the chemokine CX3CL1 and its cognate receptor CX3CR1 in the propagation and accumulation of divergent immune cell populations within the lungs following inflammatory stimuli such as chronic cigarette smoke exposure.Red cell and endothelial cells cooperatively interact to mobilize chemokines from local tissue to systemic circulation. One mechanism of regulating inflammatory chemokine concentrations is the Duffy antigen, a minor blood group antigen, expressed on red cells of most individuals and upregulated on endothelium during inflammatory states.Red cell transfusion and augmentation of existing lung inflammation and injury. Understanding the mechanisms of erythrocyte alterations during red cell storage and its in vivo consequences may provide insight into a common issue in the critically ill.




CME Courses

2016 Pitt-Munich International Lung Conference: Part 2

2016 Pitt-Munich International Lung Conference: Part 2

Publish Date: 2/7/2017
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DOM Medical Grand Rounds: Red Cell Transfusion

DOM Medical Grand Rounds: Red Cell Transfusion

Publish Date: 3/13/2017
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