Using normal brain development as a comparison, Dr. Lewis discusses how alterations in development can lead to the underlying abnormalities of the brain that are associated with the symptoms of schizophrenia.

Educational objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe a sensitive period in development
  • Describe alterations in cortical circuitry in schizophrenia
  • Explain how these alterations may arise during sensitive periods

Reading Resources:

  1. Lewis DA and Levitt P: Schizophrenia as a disorder of neurodevelopment. Annu Rev Neurosci 25:409-432, 2002.
  2. Hashimoto T, Nguyen QL, Rotaru D, Keenan T, Arion D, Beneyto M, Gonzalez-Burgos G, and Lewis DA: Protracted developmental trajectories of GABAA receptor α1 and α2 subunit expression in primate prefrontal cortex. Biol Psychiatry 65:1015–1023, 2009.
  3. Hoftman, GD and Lewis DA: Postnatal developmental trajectories of neural circuits in the primate prefrontal cortex: Identifying sensitive periods for vulnerability to schizophrenia. Schizophr Bull 37:493-503, 2011.

Disclosures:

Dr. Lewis has financial interests with the following any entity or entities producing health care goods or services as indicated below:

  • Grant/Research Support:  Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer
  • Consultant: Autifony,Bristol-Myers Squibb, Concert Pharmaceuticals, Sunovion

Accreditation Statement:

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Other health care professionals are awarded (0.1) continuing education units (CEU) which are equivalent to 1.0 contact hour.

For your credit transcript, please access our website 4 weeks post-completion at http://ccehs.upmc.edu and follow the link to the Credit Transcript page. If you do not provide the last 5 digits of your SSN on the next page you will not be able to access a CME credit transcript. Providing your SSN is voluntary.

Release Date: 10/23/2012 | Last Modified On: 6/29/2014 | Expires: 6/29/2015

Using normal brain development as a comparison, Dr. Lewis discusses how alterations in development can lead to the

underlying abnormalities of the brain that are associated with the symptoms of schizophrenia.

Educational objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

Describe a sensitive period in development
Describe alterations in cortical circuitry in schizophrenia
Explain how these alterations may arise during sensitive periods

Reading Resources:

Lewis DA and Levitt P: Schizophrenia as a disorder of neurodevelopment. Annu Rev Neurosci 25:409-432, 2002.
Hashimoto T, Nguyen QL, Rotaru D, Keenan T, Arion D, Beneyto M, Gonzalez-Burgos G, and Lewis DA: Protracted

developmental trajectories of GABAA receptor α1 and α2 subunit expression in primate prefrontal cortex. Biol

Psychiatry 65:1015–1023, 2009.
Hoftman, GD and Lewis DA: Postnatal developmental trajectories of neural circuits in the primate prefrontal cortex:

Identifying sensitive periods for vulnerability to schizophrenia. Schizophr Bull 37:493-503, 2011.

Disclosures:

Dr. Lewis has financial interests with the following any entity or entities producing health care goods or

services as indicated below:

Grant/Research Support: BMS Foundation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Curridium Ltd, Pfizer
Consultant: Bristol-Myers Squibb

Accreditation Statement:

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical

Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA

Category 1 CreditsTM. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in

the activity. Other health care professionals are awarded (0.1) continuing education units (CEU) which are

equivalent to 1.0 contact hour.

For your credit transcript, please access our website 4 weeks post-completion at http://ccehs.upmc.edu and follow

the link to the Credit Transcript page. If you do not provide the last 5 digits of your SSN on the next page you

will not be able to access a CME credit transcript. Providing your SSN is voluntary.

Release Date: 5/10/2011 | Last Modified On: 5/10/2011 | Expires: 5/9/2012
This course has been expired.