Joan C Rogers PhD OTRL FAOTA
  • Joan C. Rogers, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

    Dr. Joan Rogers is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy within the University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS). She is also a Professor of Psychiatry and a Professor within the School of Nursing. Additionally, she is a member of both the Space Committee and the Academic Integrity Committee within the SHRS.

Joan C. Rogers, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Joan Rogers is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy within the University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS). She is also a Professor of Psychiatry and a Professor within the School of Nursing. Additionally, she is a member of both the Space Committee and the Academic Integrity Committee within the SHRS.

Profile:

Dr. Joan Rogers is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy within the University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS). She is also a Professor of Psychiatry and a Professor within the School of Nursing. Additionally, she is a member of both the Space Committee and the Academic Integrity Committee within the SHRS. At the present time, Dr. Rogers remains certified by the American Occupational Therapy Association and continues her work as an Occupational Therapy Consultant for the Center for Rehabilitation Services in Pittsburgh, PA, in addition to her responsibilities at the University.

Dr. Rogers holds a BS in Biology from Canisius College and earned her MA in Occupational Therapy from the University of Southern California in 1968. She completed her education in 1975 with a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, IL, in Educational Psychology; Life-Span Human Development.

Currently, Dr. Rogers is actively involved in several research projects at the University. Recently, she has been featured in various publications for her efforts regarding the relationship between impairment, disability, and handicap in older adults with physical, cognitive, and affective impairments. However, the relative validity of functional assessment methodologies (e.g., self and proxy report, performance testing) is a second research thrust of her research. To achieve her result, Dr. Rogers is using a variety of research methods that include behavior rehabilitative interventions for nursing home residents with dementia and medication adherence in adults with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as survey (assistive technology) and qualitative methods (clinical reasoning).