Dr. Charles F. Reynolds III, MD, presents on on DSM-5: Changes and Implications for Clinical Practice Sleep Wake Disorders.

Educational objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Specify how common mental disorders and sleep wake disorders interact and mutually exacerbate each other
  • Discuss when to refer a patient for a specialty sleep medicine consultation
  • Discuss specific diagnostic criteria for sleep/wake disorders in DSM-5

Reading Resources:

  1. Reynolds CF 3rd, O'Hara R. DSM-5 sleep-wake disorders classification: overview for use in clinical practice. Am J Psychiatry. 2013 Oct 1;170(10):1099-101.
  2. Ohayon MM, Dauvilliers Y, Reynolds CF 3rd. Operational definitions and algorithms for excessive sleepiness in the general population: implications for DSM-5 nosology. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;69(1):71-9.
  3. Reynolds CF 3rd. Troubled Sleep, troubled minds, and DSM-5. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):990-1.

Disclosures:

Dr. Reynolds has financial interests with the following any entity or entities producing health care goods or services as indicated below:

Grant and research support:

  • National Institute of Mental Health
  • National Institute on Aging
  • National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
  • Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)
  • John A. Hartford Foundation
  • American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
  • Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
  • Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)
  • National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC)
  • American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (services as associate editor)
  • UPMC Endowment in Geriatric Psychiatry
  • Forest Laboratories, Pfizer, Lilly, BristolMyersSquibb
  • (provide pharmaceuticals for NIH-sponsored research)

Accreditation Statement:

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of .5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Other health care professionals are awarded (0.05) continuing education units (CEU) which are equivalent to .5 contact hour.

For your credit transcript, please access our website 4 weeks post-completion at http://ccehs.upmc.edu and follow the link to the Credit Transcript page. If you do not provide the last 5 digits of your SSN on the next page you will not be able to access a CME credit transcript. Providing your SSN is voluntary.

Release Date: 6/30/2014 | Last Modified On: 6/30/2014 | Expires: 6/30/2015

This course has been expired.