Greg J Siegle PhD
  • Greg J. Siegle, PhD

    Dr. Siegle's research program examines neurophysiological substrates of cognition and emotion in depression and anxiety through the lifespan using self-report, behavioral, physiological, and neuroimaging (MRI) assessment, as well as computational modeling.

Greg J. Siegle, PhD

Dr. Siegle's research program examines neurophysiological substrates of cognition and emotion in depression and anxiety through the lifespan using self-report, behavioral, physiological, and neuroimaging (MRI) assessment, as well as computational modeling.

Profile:

Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Dr. Siegle's research program examines neurophysiological substrates of cognition and emotion in depression and anxiety through the lifespan using self-report, behavioral, physiological, and neuroimaging (MRI) assessment, as well as computational modeling. A specific goal of this work is to better understand what cognitive and brain processes predict and change with recovery, and how to improve treatments by targeting these mechanisms more directly. The role of sustained emotional information processing (e.g., rumination) is a particular focus of this work.

Dr. Siegle directs the Program in Cognitive Affective Neuroscience, which has a number of ongoing projects.
He is also on the executive team of the Mood Disorders Treatment and Research Program (MDTRP) which is the clinical trials unit for Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. They do their psychotherapy and psychopharmacology studies through the MDTRP.

His lab has opportunities for post-docs as well as undergraduates, and research assistants.
It's important to Dr. Siegle to devote adequate time to mentoring each student in his lab. Due to the large number of students currently affiliated with his lab, this year (2012) he doesn't currently intend to consider taking an incoming graduate student for entry in Fall 2012.

Dr. Siegle received his PhD through the San Diego State University / University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology.