New National Academy of Medicine Inductees

January 1, 0001 On October 19, in Washington D.C. three UPMC physicians and faculty members of the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences were inducted into the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Founded in 1970 as the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) is one of three academies that make up the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies) in the United States. Operating under the 1863 Congressional charter of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academies are private, nonprofit institutions that work outside of government to provide objective advice on matters of science, technology, and health. Election to the academy is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

The three new inductees into NAM include:

Amy Houtrow, MD, PhD, MPH
Dr. Houtrow is a Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Vice Chair for Quality and Outcomes; Director of the Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine Fellowship; Chief of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine Services at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and Medical Director of the Rehabilitation Institute at UPMC Children’s. Dr. Houtrow was inducted into the academy for her research evaluating disability trends in childhood and the interactions among families, the health system, and social factors, which has uncovered disparities with enormous policy implications for the pediatric population.

Robert M. Friedlander, MD, MA
Dr. Friedlander is the chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery, and the Walter E. Dandy Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC. Dr. Friedlander was selected for induction into the academy for demonstrating the role of caspases in cell-death pathways in neurologic diseases, and for groundbreaking discoveries that have led to the development of novel therapies to improve outcomes for patients suffering from stroke, brain and spinal cord injury, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Clifton Watson Callaway, MD, PhD 
Dr. Callaway is the Ronald D. Stewart Endowed Chair in Research and professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC. Dr. Callaway’s selection for induction into NAM was based on his achievements in basic and clinical research to reduce brain injury after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and improve patient outcomes.

Congratulations to all three new NAM inductees.